Just a reflection, of a reflection

When I first entered a Yayoi Kusama mirror room for the first time at an art gallery in Toronto, I was amazed and also baffled at the optical infinity that seemingly occurred when mirrors faced off against mirrors.

Personal photo taken in Toronto
Photo by Danny Lines on Unsplash

I had experienced this feeling before in expensive hotel elevators but the Yayoi Kusama mirror works added so many more dimensions to the experience. I later found that Yayoi lives voluntarily in a psychiatric hospital and I started to wonder if her world of infinite patterns and reflection were a nightmare incarnated and that her art was a release less of expression and more a mirror of her (very creative) mind to prove the depths of one’s psyche.

This week we learnt about critical thinking and using reflection within the creative process. It soon became apparent that we were of course not looking at the literal reflection in mirrors or photographs, but how to examine complicated processes involved in the design process.

The reason I mention Yayoi Kusama’s artwork is that.. I feel that designers, when creating digital experiences; are almost creating virtual mirror rooms for users (very much so for VR experiences)

We shall be leading users through a reflective, interactive experience and unless we can gauge (as designers) what we aim for the eventual outcome to be, reflectively for users; we shall just add to the complex hallways of experience that indeed could lead to sending society mad.

So how can I help out in this space? essentially it leads to one core “value” to be considered when designing anything, that, is to be kind and to use emotional intelligence to create a pleasant experience for the future users of your designs

Aside from the emotional reflection of the design process and its outcomes, which is actually known as the “affective domain” as I have learned this week, we were asked to look at our existing CRJ entries and to reflect upon them using various domains taught this week.

These were as follows:

  • Dispositional domain
  • Affective domain
  • Interpersonal domain
  • Cognitive domain
  • Procedural domain

Looking at my existing journal entries, I went through and highlighted the text, matching paragraphs to the colour on a key that I had given each domain.

I made some infographics to display the reflective domains I had used and to what degree, I gauged this by looking at the overall word count of my journal entries and then split the paragraphs that matched the style of a domain and compared the highlighted areas to the main text.

The most dominant domain in my journals is the Affective domain, coming up around 38% total average.

So reflecting my reflections!

I would say the Dispositional domain would need to be applied more to my CRJ entries as I start larger tasks and projects ahead of me, my Interpersonal domain would need a little more focus also I would say.

This is because there shall be a lot more interaction with others that need to be gauged in future projects and the communication, decision making and assertiveness have to be understood in order to gauge the metrics and where to improve or even apply Procedural domain theory into practice.

I can address the imbalances in the future by acknowledging the five domains and applying them whilst planning projects, I can address the skills I’ll need to undertake projects by thinking about how I shall critically reflect on them post-completion.

S.M.A.R.T Planning

Within my week 3 journal, I state the below-chosen entries, these paragraphs can be adapted into S.M.A.R.T planning.

I have chosen to look at the first sequence of the user journey as the overall animation which it forms is huge and although amazing, it is highly detailed and has far too much interactivity to dissect in its entirety.

I felt that the storyboard method of rapid ideation prototyping would be best for this as it was a linear timeline triggering multiple elements.”

In the user journey of said interactive animation, simply scrolling the website downwards with the mouse reveals the product via the use of lighting in the style of the natural dusk till dawn movement of the sun.”

Advanced lighting position storyboard to help show where the omnipresent lights were hitting the high-end imagery

S – SpecificI have chosen to look at the first sequence of the user journey” by stating an exact part to replicate I broke down the overall piece of media into a segment that specifically had a beginning and end, yet was not gaugeable by a timeline as a video would be normally.

M – Measurable In the user journey of said interactive animation, simply scrolling the website downwards with the mouse reveals the product via the use of lighting in the style of the natural dusk till dawn movement of the sun.” here we could measure the outcome of the task by measuring progress by the mentioned complex lighting motion of the sun as a guide, comparing it to a natural phenomenon is a measurable comparison.

A – Achievable I felt that the storyboard method of rapid ideation prototyping would be best for this as it was a linear timeline triggering multiple elements.” By using the storyboard prototype method we can see that the user journey can be created in a medium and that it just needs to be built with different tools to make it an achievable finished product

R – RelevantAdvanced lighting position storyboard to help show where the omnipresent lights were hitting the high-end imagery” By creating the additional storyboard I had a way of gauging intricacies with an extra tool, creating a linear feel to the non-linear existing media I chose to prototype in retrograde.

T – Time-bound “it is highly detailed and has far too much interactivity to dissect in its entirety.” by acknowledging that the overall size of the media that I chose to prototype was too big in its entirety, we can make a time-based judgment that was essential to planning.

References